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Support UCSF’s PhD graduate students in the quantitative biosciences.

Biophysics students

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During the journey to becoming seasoned scientists, PhD graduate students spend years of training at UCSF. Along the way, they:

  • Think about science problems in new and interesting ways.
  • Work as a matter of course across disciplines.
  • Inspire and challenge faculty researchers.

As their careers unfold, they will carry forward advances in science at a pace unimaginable today.

To attract and retain the very best graduate students, UCSF, like all leading universities, provides its students with support that covers tuition and fees and a stipend for living expenses for the full five to six years it takes to earn a PhD.

The total cost to support each graduate student at UCSF comes to approximately $250,000 over the course of his or her training.

UCSF gathers these funds from a variety of sources, with the majority coming from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through faculty grants and training grants, as well as from institutional support and important private support.

BMI students

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With recent and substantial increases in tuition and fees for PhD students across the University of California system, UCSF is pressed to maintain its graduate student numbers. In fact, overall PhD enrollment at UCSF has declined in recent years despite the large and competitive applicant pool.

This reality is especially troubling at a time when the biological and quantitative sciences—once largely separate—are now coming together in powerful new ways to reveal the actions and interactions of biology, often those that function properly in health and are dysfunctional and often unregulated in disease.

As this movement progresses, quantitative scientists—mathematicians, physicists, computer scientists, chemists, and engineers—are increasingly working alongside biological scientists—systems biologists, geneticists, and pharmacy and medical scientists.

These kinds of new research relationships are quickly forming at UCSF where they being championed by the Quantitative Biosciences Consortium (QBC). This umbrella program brings together five PhD graduate programs in the quantitative and biological sciences:

  1. Bioengineering
  2. Biological and Medical Informatics (emphasis in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics)
  3. Biophysics
  4. Chemistry and Chemical Biology
  5. Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics

CCB students

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QBC advocates for these programs and their graduate students and seeks support for graduate student fellowships as well as postdoctoral scholars.

Please consider supporting UCSF’s PhD graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in the quantitative biosciences. Student support is one of UCSF's greatest needs and highest priorities.

Sincerely,

Charles Craik signature

Charles Craik, PhD
QBC Director / Chemistry and Chemical Biology Graduate Program Director

and

Matthew Jacobson signature

Matthew Jacobson, PhD
QBC Associate Director

with

  • Tejal Desai, PhD
    Bioengineering Graduate Program Director
  • Ryan Hernandez, PhD
    Biological and Medical Informatics Graduate Program Director
  • Tanja Kortemme, PhD
    Biophysics Graduate Program Director
  • Deanna Kroetz, PhD
    Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics Graduate Program Director

Make a gift today

Your gift to the graduate programs in the quantitative biosciences is directed through the School of Pharmacy PhD fellowship fund.

More information

Brandon O'Hare
Director of Development
UCSF School of Pharmacy and Graduate Division
brandon.o'[email protected]
office: 415-476-3947
 

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